Chaplains connect the sacred and the secular

Chaplains connect the sacred and the secular

As published in the Gannett Appleton Post Crescent – May 6, 2018 “You can’t talk about God here. It isn’t allowed,” yelled the woman across the room as I quietly prayed with a crime victim. We were in a public place. The woman I was comforting asked if I would pray...
Creating an Environment of Respect Begins at Home

Creating an Environment of Respect Begins at Home

“I wish I could tell my dad I have no respect for him. He is such a hypocrite. He says one thing and does another.” “I wish my son would tell me why he is so disrespectful and ungrateful. I try to do my best for him.” “I wish I could tell my daughter to respect...
Honoring a Noble Profession

Honoring a Noble Profession

My daughter raised her right hand to be sworn in. On my honor, I will never betray my badge, my integrity, my character, or the public trust. I will always have the courage to hold myself and others accountable for our actions. I will always uphold the Constitution,...
Collaboration Is the Key to Transforming Community

Collaboration Is the Key to Transforming Community

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness… it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair…” So begins Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two...

The Lemon Test

Chaplaincy is protected under the Lemon vs. Kurtzman ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States of America. It is considered a necessary function of government to care for the holistic mind, body, and spirit of its citizenry. Chaplaincy is not a function that forms religion; therefore, it is protected under this law. The Lemon test was formulated by Chief Justice Warren Burger. The court in Lemon v. Kurtzman ruled three requirements for government concerning religion, they are:

1. The government’s action must have a secular legislative purpose. (Such as a Chaplain providing crisis response or humanitarian aid for mind, body, and spirit during times of crisis.)

2. The government’s action must not have the primary effect of either advancing or inhibiting religion. (Such as a Chaplain providing aid to people of all faith backgrounds and refusing to solicit members for a specific religion or faith organization.)

3. The government’s action must not result in an “excessive government entanglement” with religion. (Such as a Chaplain providing temporary crisis response services to people in need of humanitarian aid for mind, body, and spirit outside the confines of a church or faith organization.)

Did you know that there were full time paid Chaplains appointed to the very first Continental Congress in 1737? Chaplains have faithfully served the federal government, all branches of the military, and both houses of congress for over 280 years.